Colombia

Huila Supremo 17/18

SGD$16.00
SGD$6.50

Huila is a mountainous region that lies in the southwest of the country between the Eastern and Central mountain ranges, in the Colombian Massif, where these meet. It is nestled on the flank of the Andes near the Nevado del Huila volcano, the second highest peak in Colombia. The rich soils and lush climate are ideal for many crops including yucca, sugar cane, bananas, cocoa, and beans, as well as coffee. Since the region lies relatively close to the equator it means that coffee harvesting happens almost year round, enabling high volumes of production. Rich volcanic soils, lush climate, and ideal altitude all combine to make coffee from the Huila district some of the most exquisite in Colombia. And in 2013, it received Denomination of Origin status for coffee, putting it on a parr with the status awarded to champagne, Roquefort cheese, and many other foods and beverages with unique, location-specific characteristics.

ORIGIN COUNTRY:
Colombia
Region:
Farm:
Farmer:
masl:
Notes:
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Intensity
10
Very Soft
Soft
Medium
Strong
Very Strong

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Huila is a mountainous region that lies in the southwest of the country between the Eastern and Central mountain ranges, in the Colombian Massif, where these meet. It is nestled on the flank of the Andes near the Nevado del Huila volcano, the second highest peak in Colombia.  The rich soils and lush climate are ideal for many crops including yucca, sugar cane, bananas, cocoa, and beans, as well as coffee.

Since the region lies relatively close to the equator it means that coffee harvesting happens almost year round, enabling high volumes of production.  Rich volcanic soils, lush climate, and ideal altitude all combine to make coffee from the Huila district some of the most exquisite in Colombia.  And in 2013, it received Denomination of Origin status for coffee, putting it on a parr with the status awarded to champagne, Roquefort cheese, and many other foods and beverages with unique, location-specific characteristics.

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What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

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Beans
Huila Supremo 17/18
SCA
83
Price :
SGD$16.00
Origin
Colombia
Varietal
Caturra
Typica

Huila is a mountainous region that lies in the southwest of the country between the Eastern and Central mountain ranges, in the Colombian Massif, where these meet. It is nestled on the flank of the Andes near the Nevado del Huila volcano, the second highest peak in Colombia. The rich soils and lush climate are ideal for many crops including yucca, sugar cane, bananas, cocoa, and beans, as well as coffee. Since the region lies relatively close to the equator it means that coffee harvesting happens almost year round, enabling high volumes of production. Rich volcanic soils, lush climate, and ideal altitude all combine to make coffee from the Huila district some of the most exquisite in Colombia. And in 2013, it received Denomination of Origin status for coffee, putting it on a parr with the status awarded to champagne, Roquefort cheese, and many other foods and beverages with unique, location-specific characteristics.

As one of the biggest coffee producers in the world (third), Colombia accounts for 12% of the world’s coffee supply. With thousands of nutrient-dense hills and mountains, this wet climate and high elevation has given Colombia great advantage to not only grow coffee easily but it has enabled them to grow amazing quality coffee. There are more than 600,000 coffee farmers in Colombia and the country’s annual export is around 11-13 million bags of coffee.

Lying directly on the Equator, Colombia is one of the few coffee producing countries with two harvests a year: one in the autumn and the other in the spring. With two harvests there are fresh beans around the entire year. These awesome coffee comes almost exclusively from arabica cultivars. This is because the volcanic soil, annual rainfall and high altitudes of 900–2,000 metres of the main coffee-producing regions provide an ideal environment for arabicas.

Coffee was first brought to Colombia in the early 1700's by Jesuit priests who arrived with Spanish settlers. The first crops were harvested in the Northeast part of the country, but coffee was quickly adopted across the nation by small, family farms as a local cash crop. The Colombian coffee Region, also known as the Coffee Triangle is a part of the Colombian Paisa region in the rural area of Colombia. In 2011, The area is listed in UNESCO as a "Coffee-Cultural-Landscape".

Coffee is grown in the western parts of the country throughout the three mountain ranges running parallel to the Pacific coast. There are a total of 22 coffee growing regions and they are divided into 3 areas and the impact of coffee bean origins can be detected in the flavour as a general guide: SOUTH | Those that grow in the south have citrus notes with the tint of lemon. CENTRAL | Those from the central area are fruity and herbal. Mostly containing berry notes. NORTH | The last group of beans are from the north and they have traces of nuts and chocolate. Most of the coffee harvest is produced in the central and southern areas, while the main areas for organic production are the north and the south where the soil is naturally favorable to coffee farming. Organic production only accounts for a few percent of the total, but its volume is growing strongly. Most of these coffee is grown on small family farms on the steep slopes of the Andes. The average Farm size here is only a few hectares, and traditional methods like picking by hands are the only options here on the high slopes where the coffee are grown.

Huila Supremo 17/18
region
Farm
Farmer
HUILA
Multiple Farms
Multiple Farmers

Huila is a mountainous region that lies in the southwest of the country between the Eastern and Central mountain ranges, in the Colombian Massif, where these meet. It is nestled on the flank of the Andes near the Nevado del Huila volcano, the second highest peak in Colombia.  The rich soils and lush climate are ideal for many crops including yucca, sugar cane, bananas, cocoa, and beans, as well as coffee.

Since the region lies relatively close to the equator it means that coffee harvesting happens almost year round, enabling high volumes of production.  Rich volcanic soils, lush climate, and ideal altitude all combine to make coffee from the Huila district some of the most exquisite in Colombia.  And in 2013, it received Denomination of Origin status for coffee, putting it on a parr with the status awarded to champagne, Roquefort cheese, and many other foods and beverages with unique, location-specific characteristics.

Caturra
Parent X
Bourbon
Parent Y
Leinage Description

Commonly used in Colombia, Caturra is a natural mutation of the Bourbon varietal, which was first found in the town of Caturra, Brazil, in the early 1900s. As the plant is shorter, Caturra produces higher yield compared to Bourbon. Caturra played a significant role economically and was often used as a benchmark for new cultivars to be tested against. It is also more resistant to diseases than older varietals.

Varietal Description

Carturra, which is a Guarani word for ‘small’, is a mutation of the Bourbon varietal. It is a high-yielding plant with a dwarf-like stature which allows it to be planted closely together. It is a varietal that requires high maintenance: abundance of water, care and fertilization. It produces especially great taste profiles when grown at higher elevations. Caturra is commonly found in Brazil and Latin America.

Carturra coffee exhibits the following traits in its taste profile:

  • Low-to-medium body; creamy mouthfeel
  • Bright, sweet acidity
  • Nutty, woody aroma
  • Flavour notes: chocolatey, brown sugar, berries
Typica
Parent X
Parent Y
Leinage Description

Typica has a long history and is integral to the coffee variety family tree. It has traveled from Ethiopia in Africa, where it was born, to India and Indonesia, and then throughout Central America and South America. Thus, a plethora of different mutations of Typica have been created. Today, Typica varieties can be found in every major coffee-growing region in the world. However, due to Typica's low-resistant to pests and diseases, producers prefer to grow newly researched varieties and develop cultivars (mutated and crossed coffee plants of Typica) which possess more attractive characteristics.

Varietal Description

Birthed in Ethiopia, Typica is considered one of the most iconic and genetically important coffee varietal. It is parent to many popular hybrids like the Pacamara as well as the famous Blue Mountain coffee. Although it has a downside of being susceptible to pest and diseases, its high-quality cup profile still causes it to attract demand. Typica trees have tall and thin trunks; they have conical branches and are identified by its dark leaves with bronze tips.

Typica coffee exhibits the following traits in its taste profile:

  • Clean taste, light-to-medium body
  • Unique sweetness, vibrant acidity
  • Fruity (papaya) and nutty aroma
  • Flavour notes: lime, mango, brown sugar

Tasting Notes

Caramel

Red Wine

Chocolatey